Brian Fuller's blog on the media, marketing and content creation

The breakup of CMP Media

Posted on | February 29, 2008 | No Comments

CMP Media announced today not one new CEO but four as it broke up the once-integrated high-tech publisher into four separate companies. The four new companies are TechWeb, Everything Channel, Techinsights and Think Services.
Analyst and consultant Sam Whitmore, who has a quickie analysis this morning, outlines the lay of the land:

TechWeb, under CEO Tony Uphoff, comprises TechWeb.com, InformationWeek and Interop, among other brands.

* Everything Channel, under CEO Robert Faletra, comprises CRN, VARBusiness and the ChannelWeb Network, among other brands.

* TechInsights, under CEO Paul Miller, comprises EETimes and other semiconductor/electronics brands.

* Think Services, under CEO Philip Chapnick, comprises Dr. Dobb’s Journal, education, training and various game-related brands.

CMP’s announcement said, in part:

Each of the four new businesses will be agile, innovative and highly engaged with the communities it serves.

We’ll noodle on this a bit as the day wears on, but my initial take is in line with Sam’s: Same sheep, different clothing.

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Comments

No Responses to “The breakup of CMP Media”

  1. Lou Covey
    February 29th, 2008 @ 10:46 am

    Talking it over with my cronies this morning. There is a consensus that this move makes it easier to unload unprofitable segments. Each group is under serious pressure to perform in their market segments.

    Think Services has the the easiest road considering that gaming is so prevalent and Everything Channel has the toughest in the current economy.

  2. John Donovan
    February 29th, 2008 @ 3:11 pm

    The once-pending ‘new CEO’ seems to have morphed into four division heads reporting to Levin. Is this a makover or a takeover?

    As for CMP’s profitability vs. Reed, if you fire 300 people in the print realm you’re suddenly very profitable. You’re also just started your long-term decline in that space.

    Having shot their print cash cow, can they make up for it online? That remains to be seen.

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